The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Engineering, General (ENGR) Undergraduate Courses

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

ENGR 102: Introduction to Engineering Design and Professionalism

3.00 Credits

Lectures focus on the design process and professionalism. Implementation of the design process through interdisciplinary design projects with emphasis on teamwork, scheduling, analysis, decision making, and oral and written communication skills.

ENGR 104: Introduction to Engineering Laboratory

1.00 Credits

In this class, students will apply mathematics and science principles to engineering problems. Students will work in groups to 1) conduct experiments, 2) collect, analyze, and interpret experimental data, and 3) develop written technical reports and orally present results from the experiments.

ENGR 106: Computer Aided Engineering Tools

3.00 Credits

Introduction to Graphical Communications Tools. Two-dimensional engineering drawings using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software; three-view drawings; auxiliary views; isometric and oblique projections; sections. Introduction to 3-D and advanced modeling using CAD Tools.

ENGR 201: Engineering Mechanics I

3.00 Credits

Topics covered include: Vector algebra, force vectors; concurrent force systems and equilibrium of particles; moment systems and equilibrium of rigid bodies. Structural applications and machines; internal forces; friction; moments of inertia. Math 122 and Phys 215 are co-requisites.

ENGR 202: Engineering Mechanics II

3.00 Credits

Kinematics and kinetics of particles and of rigid bodies in plane motion; equations of motion in various coordinate systems; integral forms, work and energy, impulse and momentum; computer simulation software.

ENGR 207: Programming Robots and Sensors

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 211: Thermodynamics

3.00 Credits

An introductory course in thermodynamics, intended to introduce sophomores to the fundamentals of thermal processes. It is one of three courses composing the fundamentals of the thermo-fluid sciences curriculum, the other two being fluid mechanics and heat transfer.

ENGR 212: Electric Networks

3.00 Credits

The basic theory of electric circuits including the basic laws and techniques used in the analysis of electric circuits, transient and steady state response, and steady state sinusoidal analysis are studied. Pre-requisite: PHYS 216 Co-requisite: MATH 222

ENGR 222: Engineering Mathematics I

4.00 Credits

Differential equations is the language of engineers and is an important tool for formulating mathematical models of physical problems encountered in everyday engineering practice. In this class, you will be taught various tools for formulating, solving, analyzing, and interpreting mathematical models of physical problems. Analysis of 1st & 2nd order differential equations using analytical, numerical, and graphical techniques will be taught. Lectures will be complemented by weekly computer laboratory sessions teaching and using Matlab for solving real-world problems in engineering.

ENGR 301: Mechanics of Solids

3.00 Credits

An introductory course in the mechanics of deformable bodies. Analysis of simple structural members to resist safely axial, torsional, and bending stresses caused by static loads on structural systems.

ENGR 314: Introduction to Alternative Energy

3.00 Credits

This course will deal with the issues of alternative energy sources and sustainable energy sources. We will pay particular attention to the efficiency of each alternative energy source as well as what limitations exist in terms of extracting useable energy. The course will start out covering solar energy but will then move to other alternative energy sources such as Wind, Tides, Hydroelectric, Ocean Currents, and Geothermal. This course is not intended to be overly technical, in the sense that non-engineering majors should be able to understand the material.

ENGR 321: Electronic Circuits I

3.00 Credits

The course presents the fundamentals of electronic circuits. The course includes the study of semiconductor materials, junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers.

ENGR 331: Fluid Mechanics

3.00 Credits

This course covers the basic concepts, laws, processes, and problem-solving techniques of fluid flows. It discusses fluid properties, statics, kinematics, dynamics, conservation of mass & momentum, Bernoulli's equation, potential (inviscid) flows, viscous flows, boundary layers theory, dimensional analysis, and engineering applications of internal and external flows.

ENGR 355: Electrical Laboratory I

1.00 Credits

A correlated sequence of laboratory experiments to illustrate the fundamentals of electronic principles and components as a basis for engineering system design. Emphasis on analog filters, semiconductor devices, operational amplifiers, digital circuits, and transducers, followed by diodes, bipolar junction and field effect transistor applications.

ENGR 395: Engineering Materials Laboratory

1.00 Credits

Experimental determination of mechanical properties of materials including steel, wood, plastics, and concrete. Determination of Young's Modulus, Poisson's ratio, ductility, yield strength, ultimate strength, toughness, and hardness for steel, aluminum and brass. Strength determination of wood specimens. Creep behavior of plastics; Strain gauge installation and use; Concrete mixing design; and the strength properties of concrete specimens. Report writing and application of basic statistical principles on experimental results.

ENGR 401: Senior Seminar I

1.00 Credits

Current topics related to the engineering profession, and preparation for and taking of the Fundamentals in Engineering (FE) Examination.

ENGR 403: Control Systems

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 408: Batteries, Fuel Cells, and Energy Storage

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 438: Introduction to Enviromental Engineering

3.00 Credits

A first course for students interested in environmental engineering. The course discusses air pollution, indoor air quality, and global climate change; emission and control of air pollutants; water supply, quality, and pollution; treatment of drinking water and wastewater; and characterization and management of solid/hazardous waste. The problem-solving techniques based on mass balance, chemical kinetics, environmental microbiology, and energy conversion calculations are rigorously taught for quantitative analysis of environmental problems and their engineering solutions. Open-ended problems will be assigned and a tour to a local environmental engineering facility will be arranged.

ENGR 441: Interdisciplinary Senior Design I

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 443: Mobile Computing

3.00 Credits

Mobile Computing refers to the intersection of hardware, software, and communication technologies that enable the transmission of data, voice, and video via a wireless-enabled device that is expected to be transported during normal usage, not tethered to a fixed physical link. This course explores various challenges and opportunities of mobile computing, including topics such as wireless network protocols and standards (3G/4G, WiFi, Bluetooth), location awareness (GPS), sensing (video, audio, motion), user interfaces (touch, high-res display), application development, and security/privacy concerns. This course will give the student significant hands-on experience in programming mobile devices using iOS and Android smartphones, tablets, and smart watches as development platforms (Note: students supply their own devices). Students will have the opportunity to explore various features of mobile devices such as geotracking, sensing, social networking, and multimedia as part of a semester-long development project. Students can propose their own project ideas or select one of several topics provided by the instructor. Appropriate projects for this course include smartphone/tablet solutions for various applications (healthcare, security, entertainment, education, multimedia, etc.), wearable solutions (smart watches), embedded computing systems (sensor networks, in-vehicle computing, robotics), and many other topics.

ENGR 494: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 494A: Independent Study

1.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 495: Internship/Co-Op Program

3.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 495A: Internship/Co-Op

1.00 Credits

no description available

ENGR 497: Brazilian Summer Program

3.00 Credits

no description available