The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Electrical Engineering (EE) Undergraduate Courses

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

EE 311: Signals and Systems

3.00 Credits

Techniques for analysis and synthesis of signals, both continuous and discrete. Engineering applications involving simple design problems. Mathematical modeling methods for both continuous and discrete time systems. Techniques include the Fourier Series, Fourier and Laplace Transforms. Computer-aided design methods used to obtain hands-on experience in analysis and simulation. Prerequisite: ENGR 212.

EE 312: Microprocessor Programming and Design

3.00 Credits

This course presents the fundamentals of microprocessor architecture and interfacing. Topics include instruction set architecture, C/C++ language, debugging and IO device interfacing techniques. The PIC processor architecture will be studied, utilizing windows based integrated development environment and tools suite. A PIC hardware evaluation board is used as the basis for interfacing experiments. Software will be written in C/C++ language. The Pentium processor architecture and the PCI bus will be studied. A hardware/software project will be assigned towards the end of the course. The course is 50% lab and 50% lecture. Prerequisite:

EE 322: Electronic Circuits II

3.00 Credits

Study of feedback, the analysis, design, and applications of operational amplifiers, oscillators, multivibrators, wideband amplifiers, tuned amplifiers, and power amplifiers. Prerequisites: ENGR 321.

EE 326: Switching Circuits and Logic Design

3.00 Credits

Analysis and design of digital circuits, number systems, combinational and sequential circuits. Basic computer arithmetic, applications and implementation of logic design. Prerequisite: CSC327 (Co-req)

EE 327: Switching Circuits and Logic Design Laboratory

1.00 Credits

This laboratory course is meant for students in an introductory digital electronics course that emphasizes logic circuit analysis, applications, and design. The lab work consists of circuit projects that range from investigating basic logic concepts to synthesizing circuits for new applications. Most digital design projects will be implemented using complex programmable logic devices (CPLDs) and/or field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The projects are intended to challenge students and to provide them with directed laboratory experience that develops insight into digital principles, applications, and techniques of logic circuit analysis and design. Prerequisites: CSC 326 (co-req)

EE 342: Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

3.00 Credits

Theory and application of electromagnetic waves. Maxwell's equations in vector differential form introduced; solutions to the wave equation for bounded and unbounded cases examined. The rectangular waveguide and the transmission line are studied. Radiation from simple geometrics included. Prerequisites: ENGR 222, PHYS 216.

EE 356: Electrical Laboratory II

2.00 Credits

Correlated sequence of laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the theory of junior-level electrical engineering courses, including active filters, nonlinear applications of operational amplifiers, switching and logic circuits, digital system design, push-pull amplifiers, oscillators, A/D and D/A converters, signal processing and digital filters. Prerequisites: ENGR 355

EE 357: Electromag Laboratory

1.00 Credits

This laboratory course is offered in conjunction with the junior level courses on Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (EE342) and Analog and Digital Signal Processing (EE362). The electromagnetic component of the lab covers experiments related to the basic concepts, fundamental principles of antennas and electromagnetic fields. The signal processing component covers experiments related to techniques for analysis and synthesis of signals and includes techniques such as the Fourier series, Fourier and Laplace transforms digital filter design. Computer-aided design methods will be used to obtain hands-on experience in analysis and simulation. Prerequisite: In conjunction with EE342 Prerequisite: EE326, ENGR 355

EE 362: Analog and Digital Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

Analysis and synthesis of analog and digital filters. Laplace and Fourier analysis used in analog filter design, with z-transform analysis in digital filter design. Fundamentals of digital signal processing, relevant to digital filtering. Computer-aided design and simulation. Prerequisite: EE 311.

EE 404: Solid State Devices

3.00 Credits

Electronic properties of materials including conductivity, dielectric and magnetic permittivity. Semiconductor theory with emphasis on junction devices. Introduction to semiconductor lasers. Prerequisite: EE 342.

EE 406: Advance Digital Logic Design

3.00 Credits

Analysis and design of advanced digital circuits such synchronous and asynchronous sequential circuits. Advanced computer arithmetic hardware and introduction to the design of micro-architecture hardware and performance concepts such as pipelining. The course also includes projects for the applications and implementation of digital logic design using programmable logic devices (PLDs) and/or field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) for rapid prototyping.

EE 413: Communication Systems and Networks

3.00 Credits

(3) Lecture. This course deals with fundamental concepts of communication systems and networks. More specifically it covers the following topics: Concept of signals in the time and frequency domains. Digital communication Systems: Pulse Code Modulation (PCM), delta modulation and differential PCM, multiplexing and wave shaping. Modulation techniques: analog AM, FM, and PM schemes. Digital modulation schemes: On-Off Keying, Frequency Shift Keying and Phase Shift Keying, Optical Modulation Schemes. Computer communication networks: Local Area Networks , Performance of communication systems and networks: Noise considerations. Probability of Error, delay and throughput Concepts. Prerequisite: EE 311

EE 415: Control Systems Analysis and Synthesis

3.00 Credits

Mathematical modelling of linear systems, state-variable, time-domain, and frequency-domain analysis of control systems. Root locus, Bode diagram, and Nyquist criterion. Stability and Routh Hurwitz method. Computer control system analysis and design. Z-transform and Z-transfer function. Prerequisites: EE 311

EE 416: Power Systems

3.00 Credits

This is an introductory course in the field of electric power systems and electromechanical energy conversion. This course discusses not only traditional power systems but also new uses for electric power in transportation systems. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy for industrial as well as military applications. Electric power systems is an indispensable tool for alternative energy systems, including wind and solar, geothermal and their integration with the power grid. Prerequisite: ENGR 212, EE 321/322, EE 342.

EE 420: Hybrid Gas/Electric Vehicles

3.00 Credits

This course will cover the basic theory and engineering in modern hybrid gas/electric vehicles. Topics will include hybrid drive trains, regenerative braking, electrical energy storage, fuel efficiency calculations, performance metrics, the economics of hybrid vehicles, future design of automobiles, including 'plug-in' electric vehicles, hydrogen powered vehicles, and fuel cells. This course will dedicate a few weeks exclusively to the Toyota Prius, covering not only the design and engineering of the Prius, but also the social and economic impact of this particular hybrid vehicle. Prerequisites ENGR 321

EE 421: Programmable Logic Devices and HDL Design

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 422: Mixed Signal VLSI Design

3.00 Credits

Design of very large scale electronic circuits, including layout, circuit analysis and component selection, extensive use of SPICE and circuit layout CAD tools. Following current industry paradigms, the class emulates a design house, where chips are completely designed and thoroughly simulated prior to their fabrication in a foundry.

EE 426: Computer and Network Security

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce the application of cryptographic concepts in the practical implementation of network security practices and techniques. The issues here are: What are the risks and vulnerabilities of computer, Internet, and multimedia data? What are the countermeasures to fight these back? How does cryptographic technique enforce protection? What is digital signature? What is steganography and how is it used for authentication and counterfeit detection? What the different network security technologies are as applied to electronic mail, e-commerce, web transaction, and IP networks? Prerequisite: CSC 323

EE 427: Fundamentals of Neural Networks

3.00 Credits

Introduces basic concepts of neural networks using the general framework of parallel distributed processing. Deals with architecture, principles of operation, training algorithms and applications of a number of neural networks. Each part of the course includes computer exercises using MATLAB performed by the student to demonstrate and reinforce the concepts learned in the class.

EE 431: Data Communication Networks

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 434: Communication and Computer Network Simulation

3.00 Credits

Deals with simulation modeling and performance evaluation of communication networks. Presents simulation of network elements and overall networks. Simulated network elements include point-to-point, multicast and broadcast links, satellite and radio links, queueing systems, and circuit and packet switches. Simulated overall networks include Local Area Networks (LAN), packet switched (X.25) networks, and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) based Broadband Integrated Services Digital Networks (BISDN), mobile radio and packet video networks. Development of simulation models for audio and video traffic sources and flow and congestion control algorithms. Discussion of methods of presentation, analysis, and interpretation of simulation outputs. Course will use OPNET software packages to provide hands-on experience. Prerequisite: EE 413 or permission of instructor.

EE 436: Distributed Computing and Networking

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 441: Electromagnetic Theory

3.00 Credits

Theory of electromagnetic field equations and their application to wave propagation in waveguides and resonant structures. Discussion includes partially filled waveguides, corrugated guide, and other structures. Prerequisite: EE 342 or equivalent.

EE 443: Introduction to Remote Sensing and Imaging Applications

3.00 Credits

This course addresses the theory and principles of passive and active remote sensing at different frequencies. The course emphasis is on electromagnetic phenomena rather than image processing techniques for the remotely captured data. Topics include wave propagation and scattering from targets and natural surfaces, basic antenna systems, radiometry and the radar equation. Effects of different media and boundaries such as rough surfaces on wave characteristics (e.g. dispersion, reflection, refraction, attenuation) are discussed. Prerequisite: EE342

EE 445: Basics of Computational Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide undergraduate/graduate students in electrical en- gineering, with special interest in subject areas related to antennas, radar, and electromagnetic compatibility studies, necessary computational skills and tools useful in their professional career.

EE 446: Basics of Time Domain Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 447: Artificial Intelligence

3.00 Credits

(Formerly 542) Topics may include state space search, heuristic search, knowledge representation techniques, expert systems, automated reasoning, definitions of intelligence, computer problem solving, game playing, pattern recognition, theorem proving, semantic information, processing, evolutionary systems, and heuristic programming. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

EE 457: Communications Laboratory

1.00 Credits

A correlated sequence of laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the theory of senior level communication courses including sampling and analog to digital conversion, analog and digital amplitude, frequency and phase modulation and demodulation schemes, analog and digital fiber optic link design and architectures and protocols of local area networks. Prerequisite: EE 357 Co-requisite: EE 413

EE 459: Introduction to Wind Energy Technology

3.00 Credits

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding wind power, focusing first on the evolution of the technology and reviewing basic technical principles associated with wind turbines and their operation. There will also be an explanation of the electric industry context within which wind technology must operate and the challenges associated with integrating a variable resource such as wind into the utility industry's resource mix. The course will review the impacts and effectiveness of renewable energy policy in the U.S. over the past few decades, and will explore the economics of wind as well as the basics of the industry's structure and operations. Finally, the course will explore the potential for wind power in the U.S., as well as the barriers or constraints to achieving that potential. Prereqs: ENGR321

EE 460: Photovoltaics

3.00 Credits

This course covers a variety of topics related to solar photovoltaic devices, solar panels, and the generation of electrical energy form light. The course will concentrate on traditional silicon-based solar panels, with some discussion late in the semester about newer, more efficient types of solar cells. The course also covers some of the electrical and electronic hardware commonly included in photovoltaic systems, such as charge controllers, batteries, and inverters. Prerequisites: ENGR321 or Permission

EE 461: Random Signal Theory

3.00 Credits

Mathematical techniques for analysis and measurement of random signals and processes needed as a foundation for work in radar/sonar, communication theory, or detection, and estimation. Probability; random variables; correlation functions and power spectra stationarity, ergodicity; linear and nonlinear systems with random inputs. Prerequisite: MATH 309.

EE 462: Introduction to Electric Power

3.00 Credits

EE 462: Intro to Electric Power This course will provide a basic understanding of electric power systems, including the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity. Topics will include basic AC system analysis, complex loads and power, quality factor, three phase systems, system stability, and power flow. The material presented will be approached within the contexts of the traditional power grid as well as touching upon the benefits and challenges presented by emerging alternative energy technologies.

EE 472: Basics of Information Coding and Transmission

3.00 Credits

Introduces the basic notions of quantifying information content using entropy, and establishes lower bounds on file sizes for data compression. Covers commonly used compression methods (Huffman, Lempel-Ziv, etc). Introduces the notion of channel capacity for storage and transmission, and provides an introduction to error correction coding and its role in reliable transmission and storage over error-prone channels

EE 491A: Engineering Practice and Design I

2.00 Credits

Two-semester sequence teaches the tools of the engineering profession, including project organization, application of engineering design standards, technical writing, and effective presentation. First semester: researching the problem, learning design fundamentals and procedures, and refining written and oral communication skills. Second semester: implementation and detailed investigation of engineering design and tradeoffs. Prerequisite: Senior engineering status.

EE 491B: Engineering Practice and Design II

3.00 Credits

Two-semester sequence teaches the tools of the engineering profession, including project organization, application of engineering design standards, technical writing, and effective presentation. First semester: researching the problem, learning design fundamentals and procedures, and refining written and oral communication skills. Second semester: implementation and detailed investigation of engineering design and tradeoffs. Prerequisite: Senior engineering status. Prerequisite: EE491