The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Biomedical Engineering (BE) Graduate Courses

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

BE 501: Biomaterials

3.00 Credits

Introduction to materials, their surface and mechanical properties. Biomaterials used in prosthetic devices, dentures, arterial grafts, orthopedic implants, and other medical applications. Biocompatibility, biomaterial/tissue interactions, and other factors involved in the design of implants.

BE 502: Advanced Biomechanics

3.00 Credits

This course provides students with advanced topics of traditional and contemporary biomechanics. Study will address mechanisms by which experimental and computational biomechanics investigate human and joint dynamics (kinetics and kinematics) and its association to ergonomics, orthopedic and sports biomechanics. Selected topics will include: biological materials, measurement techniques, advanced force system analysis, energy considerations, simulation using musculoskeletal models, optimization of inverse and forward dynamics, and applications of finite element techniques in biomechanics.

BE 504: Biomechanics of Hard Tissue

3.00 Credits

The inter-relationships among nanoscale and macroscale structural features and functional properties will be covered from a mechanical properties of materials and fracture mechanics perspective. Topics that will be covered in this course include atomic bonding, mechanical properties characterization tools and techniques for various length scales, and case studies involving unique biological hard tissues and biomineralized structures such as bone, teeth, nacre, arthropod shell, and hard organic materials such as wood and nut shells.

BE 506: Mechanics of Soft Tissue

3.00 Credits

no description available

BE 508: Biomedical Applications of Origami

3.00 Credits

no description available

BE 513: Biomedical Instrumentation I

3.00 Credits

Introduces the fundamental principles of biomedical instrumentation and their application to real-world devices. In a combination of laboratory and classroom exercises, students design, construct, and test biomedical instruments from the ground level up. Emphasis on use of computers and digital signal processing techniques in biomedical instruments. Prerequisites: Engr 321, 355 or equivalent.

BE 514: Introduction to Biomedical Optics

3.00 Credits

This course introduces the fundamental principles of biomedical optics and their applications to real-world devices. In a combination of laboratory and classroom exercises, student will design optical systems for evaluation of optical properties of biological media as well as learn computational methods to simulate light transport into such media.

BE 515: Biomedical Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

Provides a comprehensive treatment of signal processing techniques used in biomedical applications. Discusses fundamentals of digital signals and systems; covers classical spectral estimation techniques, including discrete Fourier transform, periodogram and Blackman-Tukey method, and cepstrum method. Covers adaptive filters such as the adaptive noise cancelling method and adaptive zero tracking; discusses modern signal processing methods such as autoregressive (AR), autoregressive moving average (ARMA), the Prony method, and neural networks and wavelets. Introduces and explores numerous biomedical examples.

BE 516: Bioelectromagnetics

3.00 Credits

Introduces use of linear systems analysis and control techniques in the field of biomedical engineering. Aims to provide students with the opportunity to use systems analysis techniques to enhance their understanding of biological systems and to use control systems engineering techniques to design control systems for medical devices. Extensively uses computer simulation to understand system causality, to perform sensitivity analysis, and to implement control system tools. Prerequisites: ENGR 222;BE 315.

BE 517: Advanced Biomedical Engineering Optics

3.00 Credits

This course provides an in-depth look at advanced optical and microscopy techniques used in biomedical research. Six learning modules combine extensive recent literature reviews from leading journals, lectures on theory, and practical labs where students will manipulate the instruments, collect, computationally process, and analyze data, and demonstrate understanding through writing and presenting in the style of technical white papers. Potential topics include: polarimetry, arthritis and epithelial dysplasia; digital holographic microscopy and cancer; small animal imaging and preclinical research; plasmonic sensors and nanoparticle tracking; and endogenous cell and tissue optical signals.

BE 518: Biomedical Sensors

3.00 Credits

This course introduces to various types of biomedical sensors including sensors measuring pressure, flow, motion, temperature, heat flow, evaporation, biopotential, biomagnetism, and chemical quantities. Underlying measurement principles and design will be emphasized. Various practical applications will be introduced.

BE 520: Medical Robotics

3.00 Credits

Students will become familiar with recent advances in medical robotics and their application in medical field. Student will learn how to design a simple medical robot using Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software. Students will learn how to derive the kinematic transformations for a given robot. Students will learn about dynamic equations for a robot. The will be able to develop a virtual model of a given medical robot. They will learn how to design, analyze, and implement different robot controllers on virtual models and actual robots.

BE 521: Neural Control of Movement

3.00 Credits

This course examines the role of the nervous system in the production of voluntary movement in humans. Fundamental concepts and current issues will be incorporated into classroom discussions. Neural structures and pathways involved in motor control and feedback, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, muscle, sensory receptors, reflex arcs, and other control circuits will be introduced. The interaction of the motor control system with the environment in functional movements (e.g., reaching, locomotion, and balance) will be examined. Typical development and learning of motor control as well as atypical motor control, in the case of motor disorders, will be discussed.

BE 522: Human Locomotion

3.00 Credits

Studies the biomechanics and neural control of human locomotion. Topics include kinematics, kinetics and muscle activity patterns of normal walking, measurement systems used in human motion analysis, and neurophysiological control of locomotion. Aims to provide students with the background required for work in the fields of musculoskeletal biomechanics, motor control, and rehabilitation.

BE 523: Biomechanical Assessment of Locomotion Disorders

3.00 Credits

This is an introductory course in the application of biomechanical techniques to the assessment of disorders of human movement. This course is intended to provide a foundation for engineers working in a gait laboratory and similar clinical environments, enabling them to interpret and discuss biomechanical test results with clinical personnel. Prerequisites: BIOL 518 and BE 522.

BE 524: Prosthetics & Orthotics

3.00 Credits

This is an introductory course in the theory and practice of prosthetics (artificial limbs), and orthotics (braces and splints). it is designed for Biomedical Engineering graduates working in the field of human locomotion. Prerequisites: BIOL 518 and BE 522.

BE 525: Biomedical Heat and Mass Transfer

3.00 Credits

Analysis of heat and mass transfer, with examples chosen from the biomedical engineering field. Topics include review of the first law of thermodynamics; one-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction; steady state and transient mass diffusion through a stationary medium; transfer of momentum, heat, and mass transfer in engineering problems; radiation from black surfaces; radiation heat transfer between black surfaces; elements of heat and mass exchangers design.

BE 526: Biomedical Transfer Processes

3.00 Credits

The purpose of the course is to provide the fundamentals of transport processes in the human body and principles of design of artificial kidney and heart-lung devices. Among topics covered are mass balances and physiological variables of the human body; physical and rheological properties of blood; dynamics of the circulatory system; heat production and transfer; modeling the body as biological membranes, especially the human kidneys. Artificial kidney devices; human lungs and artificial heart-lung devices, blood pumping devices.

BE 527: Cell and Tissue Engineering

3.00 Credits

The structure and function of cells, basic principles involved in cell culture, and safety rules in handling cells. Experimental methods used to investigate the cell deformability, adherence strength, and cell motility. Particular emphasis on laminar flow assays and micromanipulation methods. Discussion of recently published papers on tissue engineering.

BE 528: Rehabilitation Engineering

3.00 Credits

This course explores the principles and practices of rehabilitation engineering and the role of engineers in the delivery of health care to disabled individuals. Discussions of approaches to diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving motor function will be included as will an analysis of the design of devices and systems to aid the disabled. Disabilities as a result of stroke, spinal cord disorders, cerebral palsy and Parkinson's disease will be discussed. Examples of technologies examined include devices aiding mobility, limb prosthetics, robotic aids, functional electrical stimulation, and interfaces to microcomputers.

BE 529: Clinical Engineering Facilities & Regulatory

3.00 Credits

This is an introductory course to clinical engineering which is a speciality within biomedical engineering. Students will learn to apply engineering techniques to patient care and hospital-based research environments. Specifically, the course discusses various aspects of clinical engineering in topics such as medical and research equipment planning, technology assessment, hospital organization and administrative functions, facilities and construction operations, regulatory practices, project and staff management, and other topics. The class will include hands on examples demonstrating the skills used to support hospital operations. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status

BE 530: Human Computer Interfaces

3.00 Credits

Principles underlying the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing systems, as well as the major research topics associated with such systems. Technical breakdown of interfaces that are multimedia-based front ends to complex networks. Introduces graphical user interfaces, with related physiological and human factors issues. Design of interfaces using virtual reality, World Wide Web, and advanced interfacing devices such as voice and eye movement activation.

BE 531: Neural Stimulation in Rehabilitation

3.00 Credits

Aims to provide students with an understanding of electrical stimulation techniques for medical rehabilitation that are currently in use and/or development. Focus will be on rehabilitation engineering aspects of replacing nervous system function with electrical stimulation. Covers several medical applications of electrical stimulation, but emphasis is on restoration of motor function.

BE 532: Sensory Motor Integration

3.00 Credits

This course integrates engineering principles with physiological systems. A systems approach will be used to study regulation of posture, balance and movement control. The feedforward and feedback control methods used by the central nervous system to regulate motor performance are discussed. Current theories are presented on acquisition of skill and adaptation to perturbations. Use of robotics will be presented as the primary method to perform perturbation and motor learning experiments. Course instruction will be from both text and literature surveys. As a final project, each student will develop a relevant hypothesis, perform experiments using available lab facilities, analyze data and present results. Required courses: BE528 Rehabilitation Engineering BE502 Advanced Biomechanics

BE 533: Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics

3.00 Credits

This course explores the principles and practices of human factors and ergonomics. The use of ergonomic principles to recognize, evaluate, and control work place conditions that cause or contribute to musculoskeletal and nerve disorders will be covered, and the methods available to reduce musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace will be introduced. Topics include: structure and function of musculoskeletal system, human biomechanical models, task evaluation, consideration in workplace design and device design. This course will emphasize case studies and exercises that require biomechanical/ergonomic analysis and development of ergonomic improvements for industrial applications.

BE 534: Experimental techniques in motor neuroscience

3.00 Credits

The course introduces experimental methods used in the study of human motor control. Some techniques covered will include electroencephalography, electromyography, sensory stimulation, movement analysis (kinematics and kinetics), and transcranial magnetic stimulation. The course will include lectures, the study and discussion of published studies of motor control, the development of a research project investigating the sensorimotor system, and the collection and analysis of data using techniques introduced in class. Special focus will be placed on the use of experimental techniques to probe the motor system in the case of movement disorders.

BE 535: Optimization of Human Performance

3.00 Credits

Principles of optimum design, as related to human performance and the human-technology interface. Overview of musculoskeletal mechanics, with emphasis on human-device interaction for postural and propulsive tasks. Neurobehavioral measures of human performance, with emphasis on goal-directed neuromotor tracking tasks. Use of sensitivity analysis; optimal control theory applied to simple goal-directed movements. Techniques in numerical optimization, especially computer-aided optimization tools. Projects related to computer-aided design of assistive technology, interactive interface devices, performance evaluation technology, or human-powered vehicle interface. Prerequisite: BE 516 or similar control systems course.

BE 536: Mechanics of Dance and Sports

3.00 Credits

An expose' of rigid body mechanics and its application to the study of human movement. The laws of motion and the extent to which they account for human and animal motion. Human body idealized as a collection of rigid bodies, connected by joints in a treelike configuration. Insights into mechanical aspects of leaps, turns, and other complex movements observed in ballet, diving, and gymnastics. Discussion of muscle force distribution during workout exercises such as pullups, situps, and pushups. Inclusion of examples where motion is determined by simulation software such as Autolev3 and Working Model 3D.

BE 537: Neural Tissue Engineering

3.00 Credits

This course explores tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in the context of the central nervous system. The course begins with a brief review of anatomy and physiology of the central nervous system to aid in understanding the challenges to tissue repair of the brain and spinal cord. The majority of the course will cover material and biological approaches to restoring natural function. Topics that will be covered include drug delivery from cells and materials and induced pluripotent stem cells. There will be discussion of recently published papers, case studies, and group projects that focus on applying the concepts learned in the course. Drug and Gene Delivery This course explores various methods to deliver therapeutic drugs and modify gene expression. The course begins with a review of the anatomy and physiology of tissues that can be barriers to delivery of therapeutic molecules, including the kidney, liver, blood brain barrier, and tumors. The rest of the course will cover pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, small molecules, viral and non-viral mediated gene editing, gene silencing, synthetic biology approaches to targeted delivery, and a materials approach to drug delivery. There will be discussion of recently published papers, case studies, and group projects that focus on applying the concepts learned in the course. Biological Image Analysis The course is designed to provide practical knowledge and experience processing images acquired for biological research. Since this course focuses on practical application of principles of the course, students will be expected to have some exposure to either MATLAB, Python, or Java. The course begins with a brief overview of microscopy and different imaging modalities. The majority of the course will cover various methods associated with image pre-processing, registration, segmentation, and feature extraction. Students will be expected to demonstrate an abstract understanding of concepts taught in the course as well as reasonable proficiency in applying the concepts.

BE 539: Clinical Engineering - Medical Equipment Management

3.00 Credits

As clinical medicine has become increasingly dependent on more sophisticated technologies and the complex equipment associated with it, the clinical engineer has become the bridge between modern medicine and equally modern engineering. In this course, students will be exposed to the practice of clinical engineering, specifically medical equipment management within hospitals. The course will discuss the wide variety of medical devices used in clinical settings, the regulatory requirements to keep them safe, the challenges in keeping them running, the risk associated with them, the interaction with nurses and physicians to assure the equipment is used to its fullest capabilities and the complex world of Information systems and the integration of the devices. The class will include hands on examples demonstrating the skills necessary to support medical equipment within a hospital.

BE 540: Home Care Technologies Seminar

1.00 Credits

A once-a-week seminar featuring guest lecturers and readings/discussions on alternate weeks. Each student will be required to write a short "breadth" paper and presentation.

BE 541: Home Care Technologies I: Foundations

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the broad foundations related to home health care and roles of technology. Begins with a review of the current state of home care technologies, followed by learning modules: clinical health assessment tools, geriatrics and the aging process, telecommunications and information technologies, human factors design, and health policy related to home care and disability rights.

BE 542: Home Care Technologies II:Product Evaluation

3.00 Credits

Focuses on the multi-faceted evaluation process and provides students with tools for evaluating home health care technologies. Students are exposed to the underlying science and different aspects of product evaluation for key areas, with modules on biosensors and noninvasive technologies, objective human performance evaluation tools, and human usability and human error. Actual off-the-shelf products are evaluated, with the final project being team-based evaluations. Evaluation techniques include disassembly, technical engineering evaluation, user testing/usability evaluation, safety and risk management, economic considerations. Prerequisite BE 541 or consent of the instructor.

BE 543: Home Care Technologies III: Product Design and Manufacturing

3.00 Credits

This course focuses on the product design and manufacturing processes involved with bring-home health care products to market in a rapidly changing environment. Begins with modules focusing on the design of new products, on development issues for biosensors and image-based systems for physiological measurement, on important manufacturing processes and finally, on moving new products from the development stages to the market. Practice-oriented, project-driven course that gives students an opportunity to apply their recently gained knowledge to real-world problems. Projects will be driven by industrial support, student interest, and faculty discretion. Prerequisites: BE 497 or BE 542 or consent of instructor.

BE 544: Innovations in Healthcare Service Delivery

3.00 Credits

Faced with the challenges of our ever-changing healthcare environment, there is a tremendous need to improve the quality, accessibility, and cost of care. To meet this demand clinicians, researchers, engineers, and patients are working together to develop new innovative approaches to the ways in which people receive and deliver care. This course will offer an overview of the history, technology, underlying theories, and supporting research behind healthcare delivery innovations in areas such as telemedicine, mHealth, eHealth, home monitoring, and personal wellness. The objective of the course is to increase students' understanding and perspectives on how innovative approaches and technologies can be used to address real-world challenges and issues that face our healthcare system.

BE 546: Medical Device Design and Regulation

3.00 Credits

This course will consider the multiple steps in the development of a medical device and examine the regulatory processes applicable at each stage in the design, testing, manufacture and marketing of a medical device. The instructor and guest speakers will provide expert insight into device design planning, human factors engineering, device testing, quality systems requirements, marketing applications, device standards and guidances, data integrity and interacting with FDA.

BE 548: Medical Reliability Engineering

3.00 Credits

Reliability is defined as the probability that an item or device will perform a required function without failure under stated conditions for a stated period of time. Reliability engineering is performed throughout the entire life cycle of a system, including development, test, production and operation. In this introductory course, we will explore such topics as: problem solving strategies, Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA); Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA); Reliability simulation modeling; Validation and Verification Analysis; Thermal analysis; Fault Tree analysis; Taguchi Method; Ishikawa Method; Human reliability; Built-in test (BIT); Maintainability, Maintenance and Availability Analysis's. Reliability Software will also be reviewed. Real life engineering failures will be examined and discussed. This course is designed to be project-oriented with hands-on experience. Major topics are tailored to student interests (student centered learning).

BE 550: Nano-Medicine

3.00 Credits

Physicist Richard Feynman in his 1959 presentation There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom, described the possibility of synthesis via direct manipulation of atoms. Inspired by Feynman%27s ideas, K. Eric Drexler used the term nanotechnology in his 1986 dissertation, Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology, which proposed the idea of a nanoscale assembler which would be able to build a copy of itself and of other items with atomic control. For centuries scientists have been inspired to design the Philosopher's Stone, which produces the Elixir of Life; useful for rejuvenation and possibly for achieving immortality. There is an exciting possibility that through the use of nanomedicine via nanotechnology we are on the fringes of the Elixir of Life. Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary science, which combines knowledge from Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Physics and Medicine to treat conditions and diseases of the human body on an atomic and molecular level. Nanomedicine has many applications, from drug delivery to individual cell repair, to regenerative tissues and atomic level therapy.

BE 552: Biotechnology & Biomedicine

3.00 Credits

no description available

BE 554: Bioinformatics

3.00 Credits

no description available

BE 556: BONE

3.00 Credits

Bone is a very important multifunctional material that provides structural support for our bodies in its role as a hard tissue. Bone also has a number of other physiological roles such as calcium, phosphate, and mineral storage. While the biological role of bone is important, bone has also served as a source of inspiration for a number of aspects of our society including tool development, archaeology, and art. This class will focus on key aspects of bone and how it contributes to the development of our society.

BE 558: Biomedical Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship

3.00 Credits

One of the main factors driving our society is the development of business opportunities. Entrepreneurial ventures are a key factor in promoting economic development through job production, but the skills which lead to success in these ventures are often neglected in traditional engineering education. This course will introduce students to entrepreneurial opportunities in biomedical engineering by looking at the history of entrepreneurship and current trends and needs. Students will have the opportunity to develop an idea from initial idea to design concept to business plan proposal.

BE 560: Computational Models of Complex Biomedical Systems

3.00 Credits

This course explores the cross-disciplinary field of complex systems, which are pervasive in biological and biomedical engineering topics at all scales of resolution, from molecules to society. It combines a review of the scientific literature with hands-on, basic-level programming and simulation of models (in NetLogo and MATLAB). We will touch upon some of the most important topics on both sides of the science/engineering aisle: "natural" biomedical complex systems (such as gene regulation, multicellular development, neural networks, or epidemiology) and "artificial" engineered complex systems (such as synthetic biology, tissue engineering, brain-machine interfaces, or scientific data mining).

BE 581: Medical Imaging

3.00 Credits

Introduction to the physical principles, image reconstruction techniques, and advanced digital processing techniques used in modern medical imaging systems. Introduces common imaging modalities such as ultrasound, x-rays, computer-aided tomography (CAT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Discussion of advanced computer methods for 2-D and 3-D image reconstruction as well as digital signal processing methods used in image recognition and enhancement of medical images. Fundamentals of medical imaging. Prerequisite: MATH 221.

BE 582: Medical Image Processing

3.00 Credits

no description available

BE 586: Ultrasound Imaging & Therapy

3.00 Credits

This course is intended to teach the basic concepts of ultrasound, used for both diagnostic imaging and therapy. Starting with the basic wave equations and the physical and acoustic parameters that determine wave propagation, interactions with biological tissues will then be covered, leading to the basic principles of ultrasound imaging and the devices involved for their application. The biological effects of ultrasound will then be discussed in relation to the mechanisms by which they occur. These will be presented in context to specific therapeutic ultrasound applications, such as healing, ablation, thrombolysis, and the mediation of drug and gene delivery. Finally, image guided ultrasound devices will be presented, including special topics such as remote elastography, real-time monitoring of therapy, and the use of ultrasound contrast agents for both imaging and drug delivery applications.

BE 595: BMED Grad Internship Projects

3.00 Credits

Lecture. Biomedical internship projects. On-campus supervised or off-campus student training, in which students are co-supervised by a professional at the supporting institution and a biomedical engineering faculty member. Includes a proposal, a mid-term report, and a final project presentation and report.

BE 597: Biomedical Research Methods

3.00 Credits

This course provides students with basic and advanced tools for carrying out research at a graduate level. Specifically, the course discusses the essential aspects of the research process: formulation of hypotheses and project aims; literature review; biostatistics and hypothesis testing; data analyses and interpretation; research proposal writing. By using specific information and experimental data from previous research studies, students will obtain a basic understanding of each of these aspects, as well as the manner by which they are integrated in to a viable research program.

BE 613: Advanced Topics in Medical Instrumentation

3.00 Credits

no description available

BE 617: Soft Computing-BioMonitoring and Bio-Control

3.00 Credits

Foundations of soft computing (fuzzy expert systems, artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms). Use of intelligent tools for monitoring physiological signals, including automated recognition and alerting systems. Principles of fuzzy control systems for modeling hierarchical neurocontrol systems and designing smart interactive interfaces.

BE 621: Advanced Topics in Neural Control

3.00 Credits

This course provides an in depth analysis of current computational neuroscience techniques as applied to vestibular and oculomotor physiology. Topics will include basic neurophysiology, clinical studies, and vestibular rehabilitation. Students will develop computer simulations of neural control models and develop research proposals for future studies.

BE 651: Computations in Genetic Engineering

3.00 Credits

Discusses the theory and practice of molecular database searching and sequence alignment in genetic engineering. Covers databases and Internet access, sequence homology searching, and multiple alignment and sequence motif analysis. Practical classes include analysis of software setup and usage, sequence analysis over the Internet, and the interpretation of the results of database searches and sequence alignments.

BE 671: Cardio-Pulmonary Biomechanics

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to be a first course covering the broad fields of cardiac and pulmonary biomechanics. The course begins with a review of anatomy and physiology of the human circulatory and respiratory systems before focusing on engineering approaches to the study of these respective areas of study.Topic areas will include: rheology of blood, mechanics of blood vessels and the airway, steady and unsteady flow models, cardiac and pulmonary bioinstrumentation, cardiac ejection mechanics, mechanics of ventilation, and applications of imaging techniques to study the cardiac and pulmonary systems.Prerequisite ENGR 331; Co-requisite BIOL 518.

BE 681: Advanced Topics in Optical Imaging

3.00 Credits

no description available

BE 683: Principles and Biomedical Applications of Fluorescence

3.00 Credits

Fluorescence techniques have been widely used in biology, medicine and pharmaceutics. Especially, fluorescence techniques have become powerful tools for researches in tissue molecular imaging for disease diagnosis and monitoring, biomedical sensing, clinical chemistry, environmental monitoring, and DNA sequencing. In this course, the principles of fluorescence, typical fluorophores and instruments (both in time-domain and frequency-domain) will be introduced. The modern fluorescence techniques will be demonstrated in laboratory, including measuring fluorescence lifetime at nanosecond order and molecular distance at nanometer distance.

BE 721: Advanced Neuro-Mechanical Modeling

3.00 Credits

Approaches for modeling muscle mechanics, skeletal structures, spinal neural networks. Neuromuscular models that include sensory feedback. Simulations of simple models of human eye, eye-head, and elbow systems for a variety of movement tasks. Use of inverse and forward dynamic simulations to investigate human movement strategies. Addressing redundancy in larger-scale elastostatic models of the head and shoulder systems. Use of sensitivity analysis and optimization as tools for understanding goal-directed movement strategies. Includes modeling project. Prerequisites: BE 516; 535 or 621.

BE 728: Advanced Topics in Rehabilitation Engineering

3.00 Credits

In-depth engineering and service delivery analysis of four key topics in rehabilitation engineering, emphasizing the human-technology interface. Possible topic areas include therapeutic intervention strategies and the provision of assistive technology for a specific population of persons with disabilities (e.g., stroke); passive- and active-assist arm orthoses; rehabilitation robotics; virtual reality in rehabilitation; wheelchair and seating technology; and international rehabilitation. Includes eight presentations and short reports by each student, five short exams, and a final project. Prerequisite: BE 528 or equivalent.

BE 729: Advanced Topics in Biomaterials

3.00 Credits

Provides an overview of the physical and chemical properties of the materials used in health care and biotechnology. Topics include crystal structures of metallic and ceramic alloys used in dental and orthopedic implants, surface properties such as chemical inertness, surface roughness and adhesivity, and factors that contribute to implant failure.

BE 733: Mathematical Modeling in Biology

3.00 Credits

Provides an overview of mathematical models of biological systems. Sliding filament theory of muscle contraction, mathematical models of cell migration and nerve signal propagation, regulation of cell division, etc. Mathematical models of the immune system, circulatory system, and other biological systems involving population dynamics and heterogeneity. Prerequisites: ENGR 222 ; BE 516, 621 or equivalent.

BE 734: Molecular Dynamics and Simulation

3.00 Credits

Provides hands-on experience in the use of computational graphics and simulation in molecular dynamics such as the deformation of binding sites during bimolecular interactions. Emphasis is on rational design principles for drugs used in medicine.

BE 797: Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering

3.00 Credits

no description available