The Catholic University of America

Bismark R. D. K. Agbelie, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Civil Engineering
202-319-5198 phone
202-319-6677 fax
agbelie@cua.edu

Education:
B.S.C.E., Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana, 2003
M.S.C.E., Purdue University, 2010
M.S. (Economics), Purdue University, 2012
Ph.D., Purdue University, 2013

Biography in Brief:
Dr. Agbelie joined the Department of Civil Engineering as an assistant professor from Fall 2016. Prior to joining the Catholic University of America (CUA), he was a postdoctoral researcher and a visiting instructor at the Lyles School of Civil Engineering at Purdue University, West Lafayette from 2013 to 2016. His research interests include transportation systems analysis; transportation asset management; transportation safety; transportation economics and finance, policy analysis, and costs analysis of transportation engineering systems.

Representative Publications:

Agbelie, B., (2014), An empirical analysis of three econometric frameworks for evaluating economic impacts of transportation infrastructure expenditures across countries. Transportation Policy 35, 304 - 310.

Agbelie, B., Roshandeh, R. M., (2015), Impacts of signal-related characteristics on crash frequency at urban signalized intersections. Journal of Transportation Safety & Security 7(3), 199-207.

Agbelie, B., Labi, S., Noureldin, S., Sinha, K.C., (2015), Linking interstate pavement preservation investment to performance - an exploratory aggregate analysis. Journal of Infrastructure Systems 21(4), 04015004.

Agbelie, B., (2015), Random-parameters analysis of energy consumption and economic output on carbon dioxide emissions. Energy Systems, 1-20.

Agbelie, B., Volovski, M., Bardaka, E., Zhang, Z., Labi, S., Sinha, K. C., (2016), Updating state and local highway cost allocation and revenue attribution – a case study for Indiana. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board 2597, 1-10.

Agbelie, B., Labi, S., Sinha, K. C., (2016), Charging mechanisms for road use: an interface between engineering and public policy. The Bridge 46(2), 39-46